A9 2017 – Using Components with Known Vulnerabilities

You’ve done it! Congratulations! Your code is nearly perfect and secure, it was tested by a dozen pairs of eyes and money spent on code analyzing software was not in vain. It’s just one final step – let DevOps deploy it and let your customers work with the amazing web site you’ve made.

Next morning you’ve got an email from your boss and he’s not angry. He’s in rage! He’s not impressed with progress you made, but asks a single burning question – what’s that huge white face with stupid mustache he sees instead of a web site?

Your site was defaced overnight. You call DevOps and now it’s your turn to ask questions – guys, what web server do you deploy it on? Is it secure? Do you update it from time to time? Never? Oh …
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A8 2017 – Insecure Deserlization

The serialization is the process of turning some objects into a data format that can be restored later. For example, you have a forum, online shop or any other web site and you have to send objects between different parts of this site. So, during the serialization you transform an object to a byte stream, so it was in a right form to traverse around HTTP traffic or send to be stored in database.

So, the deserialization is the exact opposite process in which we take structured data from some format and rebuild it to an object.

Most poplar thing today is JSON (JavaScript Object Notation), while recently it was XML, which we discussed in A4.

So, what can go wrong, why is that a problem?
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A7 2017 – XSS (part 2)

Every public speech I make, every lecture I present, I always start with a demo. I know there are highly trained professionals out there with outstanding public speaking and presentation skills who write articles and books about art of public speaking. But I guess for most of us it’s more about finding our own way of speaking to audience.

I start with a demo because I think it makes people more involved. And demos of setting some system up or pentesting with visual results are always entertaining and eye-catching for everybody in the room.

So, when it comes to a demo of XSS there’s no better example than use BeEF.

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No, not that one. BeEF as Browser Exploitation Framework

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A7 2017 – XSS (Part 1)

Most of the time scripts come from other places than web site itself. These scripts are allowed to operate on the page and usually there’s some mechanism in place to control their behavior. You can think of it as a sand box – each web site runs pretty much independently. This also means that one site opened in a tab of browser isn’t allowed to access data from another site in a tab next to it. So, in theory Cross-Site Script (or XSS) is basically a violation of this principle. And it’s much worse in practice.a7-1

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